occupation, permission and freedom-as-overcoming

21 Oct

Last week we spent some time with the occupation on Wall Street. Then we wrote this. Then we read some other views about extending the occupation of LSX beyond its limits. Then we re-read about the power of the Space Project in Leeds and its hopes for a hub for radical education. Reclaiming these spaces takes courage. We have seen many acts of courage recently. We will need more as capital and those with power-to seek to re-enclose our world and re-inscribe our society with their power.

Then @willcommon wrote this on Twitter. The tweet stressed the importance of excess; of boundaries; of moving beyond limits; of disruption; of actions that are beyond permission. It reminded us of Moishe Postone’s critical re-reading of Marx, that our social constitution by labour is not transhistorical; it is historically situated and defined. It therefore underlies the automatic, and apparently normal/normalised/normalising, regulation of our social life in capitalism. This is then the object of our critique of capitalism. Emancipation, in Postone’s terms, is not found in the realisation of this mode of social constitution [of labour in capitalism] but by our overcoming of the capitalist relations of production, of value and of capital, and by our overcoming its automatic regulation of our society.

In. Against. Beyond. Inside our abstract domination. Against our abstract domination. Beyond our abstract domination. Overcoming abstract domination is a necessary presupposition for the realisation of self-determination.

Postone stresses overcoming and moving beyond limits imposed in states of normality and democracy and exception. This may be where spaces need to be theoretically-defined not in terms of their demands and their representations, but in terms of what they enable through excess. So in New York we witness Occupy Wall Street supporting moves against Stop and Frisk, which @newyorkist is tweeting about here. And in New York a march heads-off to the Village against fracking. And in New York there is a spin-off occupation of MoMA, because its sponsors are big finance and because art should be for all and not just oppressive.

And in this occupation as a space as a hub for radical education, we might ask, as @aaronjpeters did here, how do the current occupations connect to the lessons of the dispersed, demanding, student protests of last winter/spring. How do workerists, educators, students, support the variety of issues within and across our society that act as controls and constraints on our being? How do those students and workerists empower occupations to grow in excess of their spatial limits? As the Dean of St Paul’s, supported by transnational elites (the 1%) and in order to maintain capital’s reproduction of its power in our world, we might ask, in Postone’s terms, how do we use spaces as hubs of radical education, to overcome capital’s automatic regulation of our society? How do we develop the courage to reveal our freedom in acts of overcoming?

Advertisements

2 Responses to “occupation, permission and freedom-as-overcoming”

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Triple crunch and the politics of educational technology | Richard Hall's Space - December 7, 2011

    […] This includes active engagement with the politics of events that is unfolding around us, at Occupy Wall Street, or Occupy Oakland, or in critiquing communiqués, or in delivering sessions at Tent City […]

  2. The @thirduniversity on the @thirduniversity « The Third University - December 16, 2011

    […] We occupied everywhere. We visited Wall Street, St Pauls, Glasgow, Ayr, Leicester, Manchester, Birmingham, Nottingham. And we thought about it. […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: